How to Strengthen the Human Energy Field

The general rule here is to surround yourself with at least 80% of those things that support life into our daily life and reduce or avoid those things that cause stress or harm the human energy field.

To help give you a better understanding of this, I have created a list below that outlines those things that tend to weaken the energy field and those things that support or uplift it.

Harms Life Energy

General Attitudes

I win, you lose.

I want… I deserve….

I am better than…

Us vs. Them

They did this to me.

Why me? Poor me.

I give up. I can’t be bothered.

I could never do that.

Whining, complaining.

Impatient, intolerant, fearful, greedy

 

Relationships

Demanding, manipulative, exploitative, disempowering, controlling, violent, abusive, dishonest

 

Music

Rap, heavy metal, death metal, R&B, most pop music, most club dance music, some electronic

 

Films

Horror, most action, revenge plots, anything that glorifies crime

 

TV Shows

Sitcoms, reality TV, commercial TV, news

 

Sports

Boxing, fighting, animal fighting, hunting

 

Foods

Packaged and processed foods, sugars, alcohol

 

Self Care / Hygiene

Chemical deodorants and perfumes, chemical toothpaste, chemical shampoos, hair spray, home and car deodorizers,

 

Other

Addictions – gambling, drugs, alcohol, sex, power, drama, talking, food, shopping, video games

 

Supports Life Energy

General Attitudes

Let’s work together.

How can I help?

We are all different and there is no better than…

Somehow, I created this situation and I will take steps to change it.

There must be a better solution.

Let’s try again.

Appreciation, gratitude

Calm, patient

 

Relationships

Supportive, honest, caring, good communication, generous, loving, giving, thoughtful, considerate, appreciative, inspiring

 

Music

Acoustic, classical, folk, ambient, most easy listening, jazz, world music, happy go lucky

 

Films

Most drama, nature, some documentaries, musical, comedy, some fantasy, some kids

 

TV Shows

Inspiring, some comedy, educational, some sports, cooking without competition

 

Sports

Soccer, golf, most martial arts, gym, walking, running, Olympics

 

Foods

Home cooked meals, fruits, vegetables, water, tea

 

Self Care / Hygiene

Natural soaps, essential oils, organic and natural shampoos, generally least amount of chemicals in products, tea tree, eucalyptus

 

Other

Able to change and adapt without losing the balance of their mind. Lets go of trying to control others and life

 

I have seen many people (mainly health fanatics and natural therapists) go into a type of hysteria regarding this as they create so much anxiety and stress around trying to constantly avoid certain environments, foods, or things that may be harmful. The truth is that sometimes these things are unavoidable because we cannot control our environment 100% of the time, so sometimes we will be faced with it. So when we are, don’t lose the balance of your mind by creating stress and anxiety around it. Just accept it for now, keep calm, and when it changes, just move on with a smile. If you lose the balance of the mind and become very anxious about this, often, this causes more stress on your system than the actual environment itself.

Another exception to the general rule is that when any being reaches a highly evolved state of consciousness, they tend to transcend all the negative (and positive) effects of the external environment they are in because it appears that the external world has lost any power over them. Therefore, for these highly evolved beings, eating a McDonald’s Big Mac burger while listening to heavy metal music will probably have no ill effect on them.

The most powerful suggestion from the list that helps build up peoples’ life force is to take up some kind of regular martial arts or yoga practice. The martial arts most recommended are Kung Fu, Karate, Aikido or any martial art that acknowledges the human spirit and the existence of “Qi” or “Ki”. This kind of training will strengthen and ground the body, improve physical and psychological balance, and increase our sensitivity to our life force wisdom. For yoga, I would generally steer away from schools like Bikram and suggest studying less commercialised schools and styles such as Jivamukti, Yin yoga, Sivananda, Ashtanga, Iyengar, Oki-Do, Yoga in Daily life, Hatha, and Kundalini.

 

Any questions, let me know! 🙂

5 Lessons From Kung Fu Training

As my final days of training in the Tienmeng Kung Fu academy, in the hills of Shandong, China, come to a close, I’ve been reflecting on some key lessons that  I’ve picked up from my short, yet intense, time here.

And this is what I’ve come up with…

1. If you don’t have strength, use speed

The good news is it is possible to defend yourself against a 6 foot 5 inch monster built like a tank. How? The key is speed. A quick jab or flurry of jabs to the neck or balls, and it’s game over, monster man.

This teaching comes from the Wing Chun school of Kung Fu, which emphasises speed and efficiency over strength, especially in close combat situations. The story of the origins of Wing Chun is somewhat fairytale and epic.

It is said that a group of martial arts masters gathered to work out a super-efficient and effective martial arts style that could be taught quickly to the monks of the temple, because they were increasingly under threat from foreign invaders, local warlords, and bandits. After the local warlord heard of the meeting and new potential threat, he sent in his troops and wiped out all masters, except a female nun, who escaped. She took shelter in a nearby cave, where she continued to work on and develop this new style. After some time, a local village girl discovered this nun and, realizing her background as a martial arts master, sought her help in defeating a terrible man forcing her to marry him. The nun went to the man with a challenge; if this girl with whom he wanted to marry could defeat him in a hand to hand fight, she would not have to marry him. Laughing at the challenge, he accepted.

The nun then trained the girl in effective techniques, and when the time came for the duel, the girl had the man flat on his back in just a few seconds. This girl became the first student in the lineage of Wing Chun Kung Fu, which then got handed down from generation to generation, eventually reaching Bruce Lee many centuries later.

The full story is told in this video I recently recorded – check it out…

A well-trained wing chun martial artist can unleash around 8 punches per second! Wow!

 

2. Stretch every day

If you want more flexibility, it requires stretching every single day. Unfortunately, there is no shortcut to this.

In a conversation with another student, who is a trained physiotherapist, it was revealed that it’s not the muscle that is tight; it’s the neuro-muscular receptors at the muscle that is registering “stress” and therefore telling the muscle to lock up for protection.

Therefore, the stretching is a way of teaching and re-programming the nervous system that it is “safe” and the muscle can be released.

 

3. Repetition, repetition, repetition

Whenever you learn a new movement, whatever it may be, there is an engaged mental “learning” process involved, which takes a lot of your attention. Then, after repeating the movement again and again, eventually it will get embedded into your system, and then the mind that was previously occupied with the learning process will be freed up and be able focus on other things.

If you want to get good at anything, repeat, repeat, repeat until it becomes a no-brainer.

 

4. All kinaesthetic training helps

This refers to the observation that all movement-based training contributes to other movement-based Kung fu in Chinatrainings. When I was 20, I practiced Capoeira for 4 years, yet I haven’t practiced it for 10 years. However, for some Kung Fu kicks, the capoeira training re-emerged without effort and gave my kicks a lot of unexpected power. It is the same with the yoga; some of the yoga training came up in my Qi Gong and so on.

Therefore, all physical, kinaesthetic training overlaps and will benefit all other forms of training. Therefore, training is never wasted, so keep building up your physical movement dynamics – It all helps.

 

5. A relaxed body helps qi, speed, power, memory, and learning

When you learn new things, if you can relax your body and mind, it’s much easier to pick things up. It also helps your Qi move more easily throughout your body, offering better blood circulation and overall body relaxation. In Kung Fu, you go from hard “active” movements, followed by soft relaxed movements. When both are present, the practice becomes powerful, yet relaxed. Explosive, yet controlled.

In this way, your practice becomes dynamic, yet nurturing. Moving from intensity to relaxation and back again repeatedly is one of the keys to good health and vitality.

 

 

I am seeing how this training is already carrying over and expressing itself into my yoga practice. There is a feeling that my yoga will naturally take on a more martial arts dynamic which I think is exciting and is  something that my students will likely see in the coming months!

So, if you are looking for a good “kick up the butt” to gain more flexibility, discipline, and feel more capable of defending yourself if any self-defense situation arose, then consider studying Kung Fu in China.

It’ll rock your world!